The Big Sick Review

Movie Rundown is a take on upcoming movies, recent releases and film news. It’s about what’s worth seeing and what’s worth a miss.

Quirky, funny, relevant. This is an accurate description of both Kumail Nanjiani and his true-story-romcom-drama. The film is touching, the characters are believable yet funny and it’s worth seeing. That said, those 124 minutes felt as though they dragged on for far longer, and as with any dramedy, the pacing was a little off. Yet Kumail’s comedy always feels this way, the awkwardness, the strange pace, the poor timing, it only adds to his character and the inevitable laughs. So perhaps that’s only a personal criticism.

Kumail Nanjiani plays himself, a struggling comic whose Pakistani family is desperate for him to enter an arranged marriage. Instead, Kumail falls in love with Emily, who is equally awkward and adorable. Their relationship is believable, probably because it’s based on Kumail’s real life. They have some very cute ups and a traumatic down. Emily falls ill, ending up in a medically-induced coma. Kumail must befriend her parents, deal with his parents’ reaction to their relationship, and handle his own feelings about Emily’s health. The best part? There’s no rush to the airport. There’s no screaming at the sky. There’s no kissing in the rain. Their emotions are raw, but real and understated, which makes it all the more poignant.

The Big Sick has a broader appeal than it may seem. It’s not niche. The laughs across the cinema were plentiful, to the point where I missed a handful of dialogue. Though it may come across as a millennial-hipster movie – he’s an uber driver who likes old horror movies – it’s pretty relatable. Kumail struggles pursuing a passion that his family don’t suport, he falls in love with a girl his parents disapprove of, and he really really loves The X Files. The tensions of interracial relationships feel very real in this film, it alerts us that even in 2017, this is still a controversial topic, one which is not nearly explored enough in films. There are so little people of colour on our screens, and even less interracial couples, this was honestly a breath of fresh air.

However, I do have criticisms for this near-perfect film. I feel that the ‘sick partner’ plotline is a little tired at this point, but it’s excusable since it’s a true-story. Not only did it actually happen, it was believable and necessary to the plot unlike many films who simply use the ‘ailing lover’ trope. Though it didn’t feel like an empty use of the trope, I’m upset we didn’t see more of Emily and Kumail interacting, who are one of the best movie couples in recent years. The film’s big problem was its run time. Though it wasn’t a long film, I felt as though I was watching the extended edition. There were many points where I thought the film would end and it didn’t. Though most scenes are interesting, emotional or funny, a few could’ve been cut to help balance the tone.

The movie was an Odeon Screen Unseen, and it was a perfect choice. It was unconventional, something most of us wouldn’t choose to see. In my case, my local cinema usually doesn’t get anything other than the blockbusters (we didn’t even get Carol). As I don’t think it would have been shown, it’s something I’m very glad I got the chance to see, and I’m thrilled I could see it early! I would always recommend Odeon Screen Unseen as it costs £5, which is far less than any cinema ticket, and it’s always a great surprise. This film is not a must-see, but a you-should-probably-try-to-see-it. It’s offbeat and funny and takes on racism in a way that should happen far more often. Romantic comedies need more people of colour as love interests, The Big Sick is a shining example.

Movies like What If wish they were this movie.

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